not in kansas

Wise words Dorothy.

Advertising and Marketing have changed and I was again reminded of that fact only a few days ago. So I was walking by the Colorado Convention Center on Stout in Denver after finishing filming a member spotlight video for BMA Colorado.  To my right is an Embassy suites and to my left is a parking garage with a rather large billboard (it covered almost 5 floors vertically and roughly 70-80 feet horizontally). Now the billboard wasn’t what surprised me, but rather what it was promoting. A video game, but not the latest flavor of Call of Duty or the new release of Fallout 4, no an iPhone game. However this particular game is FREE to download and play, but has in app purchases. The game is Boom Beach.

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Now on the surface this might not seem too unusual, but let me draw a 3 things to your attention.

First- Boom Beach is FREE. Granted the in app purchases and in game advertising are big money makers ($165,380 per day), but the actual game is free to play if you are patient enough to earn the needed resources to buy the upgraded weapons of war.

Second- This billboard is advertising a completely electronic product. So a completely electronic product is expanding its advertising arsenal to include a completely print based advertising route for gaining and retaining players. Granted this is nothing new, Microsoft has used billboards before and their main product, the Windows operating system, is entirely electronic and is now being delivered via automatic downloads to their customers. But Microsoft is an international brand that reported 93.6 billion in revenue in 2015 and 90.85% of computers use their product to work.

Third- The ad space surrounding the Boom Beach billboard advertised national brands like Chick-Fil-A. Also, the previous occupants of that exact billboard space were the American Thoracic Society (a non profit founded in 1905 that spent $720,000 on lobbying in 2015) and REI (a national sporting goods retailer founded 1938 with revenue of 2.2 Billion in 2014). So you have these two rather large ad spaces, previously held by a national retail chain earning billions of dollars per year and a non-profit that lobbies for and against bills on a national level, that is now occupied by a FREE iPhone game that you play while on break. Don’t wait for a punchline, because I don’t have one. Just wow.

 

Advertising and marketing are changing and have changed, not just in the number and type of channels but who is utilizing those channels. Do you have other examples? Post a comment below with your example or thoughts, I would love to hear from you!



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